What Does it Mean?

So, I was doing some research on Aikido the other day, and I discovered something that totally changed my perspective on the art. I hate getting too caught up in terms, but this was really eye-opening for me, so please bear with me. Most definitions of Aikido out there claim that the “Ai” in Aikido means “Harmony”. This is what I’ve read and heard for a while. However, after checking out the wikipedia definition, I learned that it actually means “joining, unifying, combining, or fit”. This is different than “harmony” in some ways. Harmony implies duality. Being in harmony with something, we have that thing, and then we have us, who is in harmony with that. This is a powerful concept, but at a certain point, limited. When we start looking at the meaning of “ai” being “joining, unifying, or fitting”, we see how this implies a “unifying with” as opposed to a “going along with”. Now, please understand, I realize my search for the meaning of this term will probably take a lifetime. I’m not claiming to have figured it out, and really, I’m not quite sure if there is a solid ‘meaning’ or ‘definition’ of it. Constantly striving to define things can be futile, but when we experience awakenings of certain conceptual things like this, I believe they should be reflected on and used as tools for growth.

In clarifying the definition (I understand that a lot gets lost in the translation from Japanese to English and vice-versa), we move from a relative or dualistic perspective to a oneness or absolute perspective. This is, from what I’ve read and heard, where O’Sensei was. He was dealing with the absolute when working on Aikido.

Now the concept of Irimi (entering), which is a huge concept in Aikido, makes way more sense to me. To fully meet, join with, combine with, and unify with the energy is a much more powerful intention than merely going along with it (although going along with things is an important principle). It implies much more power as well.

Going within, we can take it to another level of meeting the energy of our higher selves, or best ability, rather than just going along with the whims of our ego. This can be done via meditation, contemplation, or perhaps while doing an activity where we can really focus on what we’re doing. Some people can achieve this through playing a musical instrument, others by writing, playing a sport, hiking, whatever. I do, however, think meditation is the best route to take in order to achieve this because you’re forced to sit with…yourself. No activity to get distracted by (our wandering thoughts are enough distraction). But that’s just it, in meditation, we’re forced to let go of those distractions and push through in order to achieve this inner unity. Way easier said than done, but well worth it. Anyways, I’m definitely looking forward to applying this new perspective both on and off the mat. Trying to go into things and achieve unity with them as opposed to just going with them, I believe, opens up the door to many opportunities.

 

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Constantly Consciously Create

When are we not creating? Is it really possible to not be creating? Creativeness is something we can never stop doing. Our creative power is always turned on. When down on our luck, we may think that some negative force is acting upon us. In these times, it’s like our creativeness has escaped us. Thing is, it hasn’t. The force of creativeness is still there. When we realize this, we move from a position of hopelessness to a position of power. Once we consciously see it, feel it, and utilize it, now we can be in harmony with it. It’s kind of scary though. There is no off switch. This same power that can get us out of a rut is the same power that’s been keeping us in it. If we believe that we’re hopeless, we create more of that condition. We’re still plugged in.

Look how much of our lives we waste not consciously creating. What would it be like if we spent every spare minute working towards something? The dilemma is that our lives are short, but the more time we waste in the doldrums shortens them even more. What if that time spent in the dumps, or even just idle, was spent doing, or at least thinking of something creative? Here’s a great essay written by Lucius Annaeus Seneca called “On The Shortness of Life” which sparked this thought for me.

The principle that comes to mind is when we work on the 5th Awase ken (sword) practice. For whoever is stepping back, their energy and intention is always focused forward. The posturing in this practice is always forward, even though the feet are stepping back. We all have that creative resistance within looking to stifle our creativity. We must be diligent, recognize the enemy, and push forward into creativity.

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