Culture

I believe we have a world class dojo where I train in Reno, NV, hands down. It’s the reason I’ve been training as long as I have and compared to a lot of my training friends, I’ve only been training a fraction of the time that a lot of them have. Some people may train for a while, leave for some time, and then come back (I’m one of those). Not all dojo’s are like this. I’ve been in a few that didn’t have the same kind of draw to them. I’ve also been in some that did.

What makes a big part of the difference is culture. The owner and chief instructor at our dojo has worked very hard along with our senior students to create a great, growth-focused culture. Our senior students are encouraged to help bring the newer students up to the next level. Doing this brings the level of the whole dojo up and makes it a much better place to train. Giving the senior students freedom to teach the newer students sparks improvement for both of them. Ego contests between students are at least attempted to be squelched as soon as possible and not encouraged. A healthy challenge of improvement is the overall mindset and most students are on board with this. Another great part of this culture is the balance between hard, serious training and light, creative, and fun training.

Point here is that we hear so much about culture today and I’m glad. Having an awesome culture is what makes wherever we are worth going to, but more importantly, it’s what keeps us coming back. Sure, people can get away with not having a good culture for a little while, but bottom line is, who wants to come back to a place on a regular basis that doesn’t make you feel comfortable? If it’s a workplace, they may have to come back, but the people in the company who are truly valuable and know it will be looking elsewhere.

It’s not just businesses that need to think about culture. How bout creating a great culture at home? I know it’s our family and we feel like they’re stuck with us and have to take our b.s., but a lot of people who stubbornly think this find out they are sadly wrong after a certain point.

Creating a great culture for others also makes wherever it is we are a better place for ourselves. At the higher level of selfishness, we realize that enchanting others (thanks Guy Kawasaki) is also better for us. I’m of the belief that the most stern dictators who seems to be very secure with their iron-fisted rule over their subjects are truly not very comfortable or truly happy. We should strive to carry this culture wherever we go. Carrying a certain energy with us exudes into the space we’re in and is the starting point of this culture. There are some who, wherever they go, seem to cast a positive light on their surrounding area. Since the culture is only as good as the people, this is an individual task that takes on a collective power when around others who believe in creating a great culture. Everyone has to be on board for an outstanding culture to exist, and I believe it’s worth striving towards.

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Constantly Consciously Create

When are we not creating? Is it really possible to not be creating? Creativeness is something we can never stop doing. Our creative power is always turned on. When down on our luck, we may think that some negative force is acting upon us. In these times, it’s like our creativeness has escaped us. Thing is, it hasn’t. The force of creativeness is still there. When we realize this, we move from a position of hopelessness to a position of power. Once we consciously see it, feel it, and utilize it, now we can be in harmony with it. It’s kind of scary though. There is no off switch. This same power that can get us out of a rut is the same power that’s been keeping us in it. If we believe that we’re hopeless, we create more of that condition. We’re still plugged in.

Look how much of our lives we waste not consciously creating. What would it be like if we spent every spare minute working towards something? The dilemma is that our lives are short, but the more time we waste in the doldrums shortens them even more. What if that time spent in the dumps, or even just idle, was spent doing, or at least thinking of something creative? Here’s a great essay written by Lucius Annaeus Seneca called “On The Shortness of Life” which sparked this thought for me.

The principle that comes to mind is when we work on the 5th Awase ken (sword) practice. For whoever is stepping back, their energy and intention is always focused forward. The posturing in this practice is always forward, even though the feet are stepping back. We all have that creative resistance within looking to stifle our creativity. We must be diligent, recognize the enemy, and push forward into creativity.

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