a guest post by jeff black – part 3 “sound and breath essential in aikido”

Sound and Breath essential in Aikido

I have been reading interviews with Yoichiro Inoue the nephew of O’Sensei:

“Admiral Isamu Takeshita once told me the following: ‘Mr. Inoue your spirit of kokyu and motive power are different.’ I said that I never executed techniques through kokyu but rather through ‘iki’ (alternate term for ‘breath’ or ‘breathing’). His answer was: ‘Oh, I see. That’s why it’s different. Can you come to my place to show me what you call iki.’ We laughed then. It is only recently that I have begun to use the term iki. We breathe from the time we are born. This is what I said to my uncle while he was still alive: ‘Kokyu power is nothing. Things are created because of the existence of the iki of Aiki and your own iki. This is what musubi (‘tie’ or ‘connection’) is.’ Because these two iki are united things are created through musubi. It is this musubi that created the Great Universe and us with it. We should not forget that.”

It is a slow process during training to begin to see/feel this breath connection, perhaps that is as it should be. However I do wish there was more focus and training directed toward the breath aspect. Every master of aikido that I have read about has mastered the breath.

Rinjiro Shirata (1912-1993) was a 9th dan Aikikai shihan, and awarded 10th dan posthumously.

“Kotodama is not sounds. It is the echo of ki which preceeds the emergence of sounds. Sounds are the next stage. Kotodama comes first and preceding it there is ki. Ki changes into many forms. It becomes sound, light and kokyu (breath). When two sources of ki combine, this results in kokyu. While breathing it becomes sound, light, kotodama and many things. Then it becomes ‘hibiki’ (echos), in other words, the seventy-five sounds. Subtle changes of hibiki become the mystery of creation. First, there was the word and the word was God, this is kotodama and also Aiki.”

As you can see, there is a developing relationship between Yamabiko, Kotodama, breath and aiki.

Rinjiro continues:

“There are many stories of the spiritual world in Iwama. There are many poems concerning the Kotodama. The ‘Way of the Mountain Echo’ means kotodama and of course it also means Aikido. If you say, ‘Ya-ho’ (a mountain call used to produce an echo) and you hear ‘ya-ho’ echoing back, this is called ‘Yamabiko’. This is kotodama. There are a great many poems entitled ‘Yamabiko no Michi’ which means that your mind and your partner’s mind are in mutual communication. I am proposing to Doshu that he proceed one step further in conjunction with this one hundredth anniversary of the Founder’s birth as the turning point and write about the state of mind of the Founder. Otherwise, the essence of Aikido cannot be understood. When we demonstrate techniques in the dojo we should explain that this is kotodoma… We have to show ki in realistic terms. We have to show that this is not a budo for competition.”

I had not thought of Kotodama in that way before.

1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
3 And God said, Let there be light: (2 Cor. 4.6) and there was light.

So before the word the Spirit of God moved. So the ki moves first.

O’Sensei speaks often that Aikido is not technique.

“My Aikido is love”
-Morihei Ueshiba

This Aikido is a wonder, the understanding is limitless.

Jeff Black currently holds the rank of Shodan and trains regularly at Aikido of Reno.  Having trained in the art, off and on, for the last forty years or so, Jeff is a wealth of insight about the art of Aikido.  This is the second of three weekly installments of his post.  

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